Laurel Essential Oil

Laurel Leaf essential oil has a fresh, spicy scent that opens your lungs and your mind.

It’s invigorating and inspiring.

Laurel has a host of therapeutic properties. I like to remember that it’s associated with achievement and victory. So it’s a great helper when it comes to clearing away anything that stands between you and your best—that’s why it’s good for healing so many issues! (That’s how I like to think of it, anyway!)

Stay focused and clear with Laurel.

I especially love using Laurel for decongestion and mental focus. It is the perfect companion when you have a cold or allergies but still has to go to work.

Use 5 drops of this stock blend in your diffuser.


  • 10 drops Laurel (Laurus nobilis)
  • 10 drops Rosemary ct. camphor (Rosmarinus officinalis ct. camphor)
  • 20 drops White Spruce (Picea glauca)
  • 10 drops Distilled Lime (Citrus aurantifolia)



Massage sore muscles with Laurel Leaf essential oil.

Have you ever seen someone win a race and be crowned with Laurel leaves? This is a practice from ancient times that has survived to today.

When we think of Laurel Leaf essential oil (sometimes called Bay Laurel or Sweet Laurel), we can think of a cheering section to help us stay energized and go the distance.

So if you need a massage oil for sore muscles, perhaps resulting from a cold or flu (Laurel is excellent for respiratory issues!), Laurel is a great choice for your blend. It soothes, encourages, and energizes.

Here’s a recipe you can try for your next massage.


  • 2 oz (60 ml) jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis)
  • 6 drops Laurel (Laurus nobilis)
  • 8 drops Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ct camphor)
  • 15 drops Orange (Citrus sinensis)



Use Laurel Leaf for respiratory health.

When I make a blend for respiratory support, I know I can rely on essential oils that contain the chemical component 1,8 cineole.

1,8 cineole is antiviral, antimicrobial, mucolytic, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory. It’s present in oils like Laurel Leaf and Eucalyptus, which are famous respiratory helpers.

Here’s a recipe for one of my favorite Aromatherapy inhalers that I use to support my lungs and sinuses. I carry my inhaler with me and use it to prevent myself from getting sick. If I’ve forgotten to bring it along and happen to get sick, I rely on it even more.

Stay Healthy Inhaler

  • 3 drops Laurel Leaf (Laurus nobilis)
  • 5 drops Saro (Cinnamosma fragrans)
  • 4 drops Ravintsara (Cinnamomum camphora ct. 1,8 cineole)


You can get blank Aromatherapy inhalers at Amazon. They look like little lip balm tubes, and inside there is a cotton insert. Just drop your essential oils on the cotton insert, then snap the inhaler closed. To use it, just raise it to one nostril, pinching the other closed, and inhale.



Wash up with Laurel Leaf essential oil.

Laurel Leaf essential oil doesn’t want anything to slow you down, least of all a cold. It’s a wonderful anti-infectious agent, so it can “deactivate” microbes before they get in your system.

That’s why it’s the perfect ingredient for foam soap.

Here’s a recipe that’s easy to make, and perfect for the bathroom sink. You’ll need a 2 oz (60 ml) foam pump bottle.

Laurel Orange Foam Soap

  • 2 oz (60 ml) castile soap
  • 6 drops Laurel (Laurus nobilis)
  • 15 drops Orange (Citrus sinensis)
  • 10 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)


I’ll bet you can guess the blending directions on this one! (Just put everything in the soap pump. Easy, right?)

You can find foam soap pumps at Amazon They have two sizes—50 ml and 250 ml. This recipe is for a 50 ml bottle. You’ll notice that the Castile soap doesn’t quite fill the bottle to the top. That’s because when you put the lid on, the liquid will rise, and if it’s too high it could overspill.



Get to know Laurel.

Spend a little time blending with Laurel, and you may find yourself connecting with it in more ways and getting different blending ideas.


National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy – Beyond Aromatics Conference – OCT. 24 – 27, 2018 – University of Utah Conference Center & Botanical Garden, Salt Lake City, Utah

October 24-27, 2018 The World of Aromatherapy IXClick here to see a review of our 2016 Conference in

Source: National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy – Beyond Aromatics Conference – OCT. 24 – 27, 2018 – University of Utah Conference Center & Botanical Garden, Salt Lake City, Utah

Essential Oils and Flower Essences

Essential oils and flower essences bestow a concentrated dose of plant energy.
In most cases, however, you may want to work with the whole plant. You may find that if you wish to work with a particular plant, you’re obligated to grow it yourself. This may be for a variety of reasons.
* Some plants are rare in an area. You may need to nurture some indoors or order from a specialist nursery.
* What you desire may not be marketable: the alchemists treasured fresh morning dew caught upon the leaves of lady’s mantle. They called it “water from heaven” and prized it as an ingredient in many enchanted potions. If you want some {and you very well might; it’s reputed to provide a beautiful complexion!}, you’ll have to grow it and gather it yourself.
* In some cases, it’s best to have your own fresh stock of plants, to save on expense and safety. Your own roses are not only more powerful than the florists, but you’ll save a small fortune and, as you place the petals in your bath, you also have the assurance of knowing no toxic pesticides and preservatives taint them and potentially you.
* In the case of root charms, often the only way to guarantee that you have the genuine article is to actually start with the whole plant. Too many commercial preparations purporting to include items like High John the Conqueror or Adam and Eve Root contain only petroleum products.
* Unfortunately, in a growing number of cases, the only way to access a power may be to grow your own, because there isn’t any other source.

The decimation of the animal kingdom is well-known and well-publicized, but humans have done no less damage to plants. A 1998 international study conducted by sixteen organizations, including the Smithsonian Institute, indicates that at least one out of every eight known plant species on Earth is now either threatened with extinction or nearly extinct. **

Solomon’s Seal was once a very prominent magical plant, a favorite of ancient spell books and grimoires. Beth Root derives from another very endangered plant. Native to North America, aboriginal Americans prized it as a love potion. The root was boiled and then dropped into the desired man’s food; upon consumption, he should have eyes only for his enchantress. Beth Root was heartily adopted into African-American occult traditions, where it went under the name Low John the Conqueror. Only a few decades ago, Low John was a common Hoodoo charm, used for preserving family peace and encouraging economic prosperity. You’ll rarely find it marketed because it can’t be found in the wild anymore. If you want it, you’ll have to grow it. The magic that you perform together can be especially potent because the very existence of your ally indicates to Earth your willingness to provide healing for her as well as to provide for your own desires.
The best way to gain an ally is to be an ally.
In the past, wild-crafting, the process of collecting wild plants, has been the preferred method. Common metaphysical wisdom held that wild plants were considered to be at the peak of their powers. With the wilderness under siege and quickly disappearing, this is no longer true. Wild-crafting, with few exceptions, has become the equivalent of poaching. It is unethical to remove wild plants; from a magical perspective, whatever power they possess may backfire on you. The best way to generate your personal power is to replenish Earth and nature, not continue to deplete it. The strongest, most powerful plant allies will be the ones you nourish and nurture. They will become familiar with you, your family, your needs, and desires at the same time that you are providing for theirs.
If you are unable to do so, try to find a nursery that will grow them for you.
Flower Essences.
All those steeped in Earth wisdom have always treasured dew, rain and moisture gathered from plants. Infused with the specific power belonging to the plant, the tiny particles of liquid were also perceived as containing the perfect balance of the four elements: not only the power of water but also that of Earth, as radiated through the plant, the surrounding air, and fire from the shining sun.
The ancients were limited to the plants growing on their doorstep. You are not. The modern science of flower essences brings the power of plants from all over Earth directly to you.
The direct descendant of these botanical potions, the flower essences were first prepared in their modern form in Great Britain in the 1930’s by Dr. Edward Bach, a prominent Harley Street physician, and homeopath. Dr. Bach came to the conclusion that true complete healing was not possible if approached solely from the physical plane. Emotional and spiritual imbalances were the root of illness and dysfunction, and therefore true healing must be accessed through soul and emotion. He devoted the rest of his life, at great personal sacrifice, to developing the original flower essence remedies. Dr. Bach reported that the plants communicated directly with him, sharing their secrets with him.
Dr. Bach’s original thirty-eight remedies were almost entirely derived from British flora. Emerging during the Great Depression, the bulk of the remedies served especially to relieve confusion, despair, depression and fear. Since that time, many other flower essence practitioners have followed in Dr. Bach’s pioneering footsteps so that there is now greater access to a wider variety of botanical powers than ever before. The availability of flower essences ranges as far afield as the Australian Bush, the Sonora Desert, the Alaskan wilderness, Hawaii, California and the rainforests of Peru.
As befitting true New Age substances, many were created specifically to facilitate metaphysical and spiritual goals. There are specific essences for strengthening and accessing your magical skills, also for healing divisions between genders and building bridges to other spiritual realms.
How To Use Flower Essences.
* The most common method of use is internal. Flower essences are usually sold as concentrated stock bottles and must be further diluted in pure spring-water. The general dosage is four drops four times a day, however, instructions are available on the bottles or from the manufacturers.
* Flower essences can also be applied topically, rubbed gently onto the body. A few drops on the soles of the feet or on the thin skin between thumb and forefinger before bedtime are especially beneficial. Flower essences can also be added to massage oil or bath.
* A room spray or atmospheric cleanser can be created by adding flower essences to a spray bottle of spring-water.
* Flower essences can be used to enhance and heal the power of crystals, plants, and amulets.
Apply a few drops as needed.
Although flower essences and essential oils have confusingly similar names and are sold in very similar packages {tiny glass vials}, they are by no means identical or interchangeable.
Essential oils are actually planted extracts, with extremely potent and scientifically documented physical effects. All essential oils, for instance, are antiseptic, to varying degrees. How flower essences work remains the subject of debate, the general consensus being that they are a form of vibrational healing. Flower essences are pure water infused and charged with the plant’s energy and vibration. There is no need to kill the plant to create the essence; typically only carefully selected leaves and blossoms are used. The essences are designed to provide a bridge between the plant’s healing aura and your own. There is no direct physical effect; instead, their profound effect is felt upon the emotional and spiritual plane. They are safe for everyone’s use, children and animals included. Flower essence remedies can also be used to benefit plants and crystals.
Flower essences are created for every situation and emotional state. Good source books will bestow a sense of their scope. The Following flower essences are especially beneficial for enhancing your magickal aptitude.
Flower essences are available directly from the manufacturer and also from many health food stores and alternatively oriented pharmacies.
* Angelica {Angelica arcangelica}: enhances the ability to perceive and recognize protection and guidance from spirit beings, especially angels. It is indicated for those who feel bereft of spiritual guidance and protection and can be especially beneficial during threshold experiences.
Angel’s Trumpet {Datura candida}: provides assistance for those who would like to do psychic work but can’t quite accept the reality of psychic forces and energies.
Green Bells of Ireland {Molucella laevis}: recommended for those who feel ungrounded, those who lack a conscious heart connection to the natural world and also for those who feel unaware of, or unable to access, the light and intelligence present in nature. This remedy is intended to strengthen the connection between Earth and one’s body.
Mugwort {Artemisia vulgaris}: the single most profound essence for evoking psychic skill and perceptions, it promotes alignment with the moon, corrects imbalances in the feminine cycle and promotes greater awareness of dreams and psychic ability.
Saguaro {Cereus giganteus}: Because balance is crucial, with all this talk of Earth Mother energy, this essence enhances appreciation of the male energy that serves as protector, provider and the true partner to Earth’s feminine energy. For men, saguaro can help forge a path; for women, it helps heal losses. For both, it provides inspiration and healing. Saguaro eases a sense of alienation from one’s own parentage and spiritual traditions. Saguaro reinforces an awareness of the ancient and sacred. It provides a sense of lineage, a linking of oneself to Earth’s holy traditions.
Saint John’s Wort {Hypericum perforatum}: increases spiritual awareness and consciousness. It also has a protective capacity. As your psychic work and ability increases, as you become increasingly aware of other powers, feelings of vulnerability may arise. Saint John’s Wort provides a psychic shield, soothes fears, provide courage and security and calms the effects of disturbing dreams.
* Star Tulip {Calochorus tolmiei}: creates an aura of receptivity and enables one to tune into other energies, particularly in dreams and meditation. Star-tulip is indicated for those who feel hard and brittle, cut off from Earth and other living beings, especially for those who are unable to meditate or pray but yet feel the need. Star-tulip stimulates psychic awakening and receptivity to one’s inner voices.

* Yarrow {Achillea millefolium}: strengthens and cleanses the personal aura and provides a profound psychic shield. It is indicated for those who feel drained by exposure to toxic forces, whether physical, spiritual or human.

The Essence of Ginger

No modern medication can rival the range and variety of therapeutic effects that can be induced by ginger. However, the full awareness of the health benefits and value of the herbal ginger remedies is rather limited because of the monopolistic health-care systems and a historically biased regulatory environment in most countries. Out of the hundreds of species in the plant family Zingiberaceae, the ginger remains the most famous and popular herb. Ginger is a rhizome, according to the correct botanical classification, though the underground stem of the ginger is often mistaken to be a root. Many different varieties of the ginger herb exist in the wild and in cultivation, these varieties range from mild to spicy in taste, and all of them require tropical conditions and fertile soils to grow at an optimal rate. The ginger herb has traveled out from Southeast Asia to the new world, over a period spanning 5,000 years, and most regions of the world now cultivate it as a food crop.
ginger_benefitsThe ancient trade in ginger helped shape nations and insured the universal cultivation and survival of the herb, it is considered a botanical treasure by some of the great figures of history. The interaction of over four hundred chemical constituents present in ginger produce the observed effects of herbal ginger remedies, these result producing compounds can be grouped into four major classes: those which affect taste, those responsible for fragrance, and chemicals which act as nutrients and synergists in the human body. The pungent compounds which affect taste are the focus for most of the therapeutic value associated with the ginger. These taste compounds, are known as gingerols and shogaols, the protein-digesting enzymes and antioxidant compounds present in abundant quantities in the ginger are also key elements in its overall effects over the body. Most of the observable physical effects on the body, such as the anti-inflammatory action, the anti-parasitic effect, and the anti-microbial and the digestive remedial actions, may all be due to the presence of one principal action – which is enzyme action on the body. At the same time, the observed effect, namely an anti-inflammatory action, can also be due to the presence of a number of principal actions at the core, it can be due to enzymes, because of eicosanoid balance and due to the presence of antioxidants in the herbal remedy. The main key to understanding the diversity of the ginger’s overall action may lie in the dynamics of the eicosanoid compounds; indeed, these may represent the point to develop a full understanding the various beneficial effects of the ginger remedy. The physiologically active compounds known as the eicosanoids are synthesized by the body from essential fatty acids already present from absorbed food. The development of an imbalance in these vital elements is the reason for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, which evolve in response to the imbalances. The modulation and control of the compounds known as eicosanoids has been attempted by pharmaceutical companies, in order to develop treatment methodologies for a host of disease conditions, this step is essentially a failed step, because of the many serious side effects such compounds can induce in the human body. The advantage of herbal ginger remedies is that the ginger helps in naturally bringing a balance to many of these vitally important eicosanoid compounds, without inducing any corresponding side effects in the body of the person using the herbal remedy.
ginger-health-benefits-uses-ginger-teaThe benefits of ginger herbs have been enjoyed by many millions of people, over the course of millennia, as part of herbal treatment strategies. Thus ginger remedies have been utilized for spiritual upliftment, they have been used to provide digestive comfort and physical strength, they have also been taken to stimulate and bring relief from infirmity in the body, the herbal remedies made from the ginger have been touted as the herbal remedy of choice and most traditional Eastern herbal formulas consider ginger remedies as a part of their herbal treatment methodologies. The ancient Indian Sanskrit name for the ginger very appropriately vishwabhesaj, translated as the universal medicine. The early twentieth century saw more than 25,000 U.S. physicians called the eclectics, praising the pain relieving and cold-fighting properties of the ginger. Traditional use of the ginger remedies was also made by many different cultures historically in many different regions of the world – these societies used the herb for some of the same basic therapeutic applications to which we put the herb to use. Some of these herbal remedies and applications of the ginger included its use as an analgesic, its anti-arthritic ability was utilized universally, the wound healing properties were utilized widely, the anti-helmintic and anti-ulcerabilities were widely known and put to use, its actions as a stimulant and its aphrodisiac properties also found great use in traditional medicine.
At the same time, traditional treatment of a variety of respiratory diseases, and problems in the reproductive and digestive system were treated using herbal remedies derived from the ginger. For many types of cardiovascular diseases, the ginger remains a primary preventive treatment especially in the treatment of critical cases of such conditions. Similar in action and usage to the common drug aspirin, the herbal remedies made from the ginger possesses a therapeutic potential and an ability to prevent thousands of deaths arising from sudden heart attacks and strokes as well as in the treatment of diseases such as cancer of the colon. The ginger has an advantage over aspirin, in that it will produce no side effects in the body whatsoever even after prolonged and continuous use. Ginger’s anti-ulcer effects are complemented on the whole by a host of other important beneficial properties pertaining to the digestive system, which includes immense relief from both diarrhea and constipation; it helps protect the liver and is an effective pro-biotic support agent. Ginger has also been documented as clearly having an effective anti-nausea effect. The ginger-based herbal remedies can thus be used to rid the body of nausea arising from the continuous use of chemotherapy and those which affect people during oceanic travels, it is also helpful during nausea from a term of pregnancy and in treating nausea following gynecological surgery, in all such cases, herbal remedies based on the ginger is the natural treatment of choice for the nausea. The assistance that ginger gives to the digestive system marks it as a prominent bio-availability herb, and the ginger assists the digestion of other consumed nutrients and is a greatly recommended addition to the natural supplemental regimes during treatment processes for many digestive complaints. While not generally recognized, intestinal parasites pose a much greater threat to the industrialized world than they are credited for. Here too, the potent range of anti-parasitic activities displayed by the ginger can play a great role in the treatment of parasite infections. Historical observations of the ginger, place it in a role of an effective remedy for cold, this ability of the ginger arises from a combination of principal actions and benefits which can include eicosanoid balancing within the body, its pro-biotic supporting role, its anti-toxic and cytoprotective influences on the body among other beneficial effects.
BenefitsofGingerThe remedies based on ginger also have a very significant anti-mutagenic potential, and these can be used to beat powerful carcinogens such as the compound benzopyrene and the more toxic burned byproducts of the amino acid tryptophan in the body. Ginger’s reputed anticancer abilities also deserve further research and study, this property of the herb must be further investigation and its role in cancer-treatment programs must be studied in the future so as to take advantage of any beneficial effects. In addition, to all of these abilities herbal remedies made from the ginger positively affect all other parameters of health such as levels of the compound cholesterol and the levels of blood sugar, at the same time, the herb helps in balancing a variety of vital body systems such as the performance of the circulatory system, the functioning of the respiratory and reproductive systems besides others. Topical remedies made from the ginger also have very positive and beneficial effects; the potency of the ginger in this topical role has been demonstrated during external treatments which showed dramatic results and improvement from a variety of skin disorders in many patients.
The safety of herbal remedies made from the ginger is remarkable. It can be said that almost no modern pharmaceutical products can compete with the range of therapeutic properties displayed by this herb and this does not even include the complete absence of all adverse physical side effects from prolonged use of the herbal remedy. However, when using ginger products during a term of pregnancy and before surgery, patients must be careful about doses and use the herb in moderation at such times. A general safe and preventive dosage of the herbal remedy for the use of the general population can be up to 1 gram a day of the powdered herbal remedy. Dietary use of therapeutic ginger remedies must be gradual and over a long period of time in all cases, as this will ensure the optimal benefits. The quality of the rhizome will also greatly influence the effectiveness of the remedy made from ginger. Organically certified ginger products are the best, as many of the commercial ginger products are normally subjected to many potential levels of chemical contamination, at different stages of the manufacturing process. For regular supplementation, both the fresh and the dry ginger herbal remedies are recommended and these two can even be used in tandem. Though the properties and benefits given by each will be slightly different and both will have specific strengths and weaknesses. Commercially the herbal remedies made from the ginger are available in many forms, which include the fresh and dried forms, ginger syrups, and as herbal capsules and extracts.

What Are The Health Benefits of Clary Sage Oil.

Clary sage, also known as Salvia sclarea, is a plant native to the northern Mediterranean Basin. It is widely used for medicinal purposes and as a spice.

Many parts of the clary sage plant can be used, including the leaves, flowers, stems, and seeds. In alternative health practices, clary sage essential oil is used in aromatherapy.

In this article, we take a look at the uses and suggested health benefits of clary sage oil. We will also look at whether there is any scientific evidence to back these claims up. We also examine how the oil is used, and what side effects could occur.

Uses for clary sage oil

Clary sage oil

Clary sage oil may have properties such as antidepressant effects, improved digestion, and stress relief.

Aromatherapists and related alternative health practitioners often use clary sage as an essential oil in their treatments, and supporters believe it has many health benefits.

People may use the oil for one or more of its potential properties, including:

  • antidepressant effects
  • anti-inflammatory effects
  • improved digestion
  • antibacterial effects
  • stress relief
  • improved circulation

Possible health benefits

Below is a list of possible health benefits for clary oil. It is worth noting that many of the studies listed below either involved small numbers of participants or were carried out on animals rather than humans.

Antidepressant effects

2010 study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology investigated the antidepressant and stress-fighting effects of several different essential oils in rats. The oils used included clary sage, chamomile, rosemary, and lavender.

The study found that out of all the oils tested, clary sage oil had the most potent anti-stress effect.

The researchers concluded that clary sage oil could be an effective treatment for people experiencing depression. They also suggested that the effect of the oil was closely linked to the feel-good hormone dopamine.

Blood-pressure-lowering and anti-anxiety effects

study published in 2013 in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that inhaled clary sage oil significantly lowered blood pressure and calmed the breathing of women with urinary incontinence undergoing assessment. The paper includes the suggestion that inhaled clary sage oil may be an effective way of promoting relaxation.

Another piece of research published in the Journal of Medicinal Food found that including clary sage oil in the food of animal subjects lead to a significant reduction in dominant and anxious behavior.

Anti-inflammatory effects

Research published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology in 2017 found that an extract of clary sage had significant anti-inflammatory effects in rats. The researchers concluded that the clary sage extract could be an effective treatment for the inflammatory gum condition periodontitis.

It is worth noting that the study also found that applying the same clary sage extract 3 days before infection did not appear to have a preventive effect.

Improved mental function

Different sage plants have long been thought to improve mental function in various ways. A 2017 review looked at the effects of various sage plants, including clary sage. The author found that sage plants seem to be associated with improved memory, greater alertness, and potential Alzheimer’s-fighting effects.

The same review also noted the anti-depressant and anti-stress effects of clary sage mentioned above.

Antibacterial effects

Many essential oils, including clary sage oil, are thought to have antibacterial qualities. A 2015 study looking at the antibacterial effects of clary sage essential oil found that its antibacterial qualities worked against all strains of bacteria tested.

Clary sage essential oil was also found to reduce the growth of E. coli significantly and appeared to attack bacteria cells in several different ways.

Other research has also suggested that some of the chemical components of clary sage have anti-fungal effects.

2017 study comparing the antibacterial and antifungal effects of six different essential oils also found clary sage to have antibacterial and antifungal effects. However, these effects were less significant than most of the other oils that were tested.

How to use clary sage oil

essential oil burner

Clary sage oil may be diffused into the air with an essential oil burner.

As research has found positive effects of clary sage oil when inhaled, taken via the mouth, and applied directly to inflamed areas of the body, there are many options for how someone can use it. Users should make sure to select 100 percent essential oil.

Aromatherapy: Around 2 to 3 drops of clary sage oil can be mixed with water and other essential oils and diffused into the air via an essential oil burner. When vaporized, clary sage oil can help to fight bacteria and other germs in the air

Skin: Add about 6 drops of clary sage oil to 1 oz. of carrier oil, such as coconut oil, and rub directly onto a wounded area, or massage into skin. Add 3 to 5 drops of essential oil to the bathwater to soothe sore muscles and improve mood. When rubbed onto an injured area, it can have a direct antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, and anesthetic effect.

Oral: Add around 1 to 2 drops of 100 percent essential oil to tea, smoothies, or food for a soothing effect, and to help reduce inflammation in the gums. The Natural Standard Herb and Supplement Guide state that 25-50 microliters (or 1/2 to 1 drop) can be taken orally one to three times daily.

All of these uses appear to be safe and may be beneficial.

Side effects

Clary sage oil appears safe for use.

Various sources make claims about clary sage oil increasing estrogen in the body, but at least one 2017 study that investigated the estrogen-boosting effects of different essential oils did not seem to agree. The study did, however, suggest that geranium and rose otto essential oils might boost estrogen.

Other supposed risks or side effects of clary sage oil seem to be largely anecdotal and appear not to be well supported by research.

A reasonable precaution would be to test a small area of skin before applying the oil to large areas of skin and avoid using clary sage oil before driving or operating heavy machinery. People should also stop using clary sage oil and consult with a medical professional if any issues arise.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate essential oils. People who wish to use them should speak to their healthcare provider first and be sure to obtain the oils from a respected supplier.


A large body of research suggests that clary sage oil could have many health benefits.

These benefits include anti-depressant and anti-stress effects, likely connected to the hormone dopamine. These effects could make clary sage an effective natural remedy for low moods. It is worth noting that many studies do not involve large groups of humans, however.

Clary sage oil has also been shown to lower blood pressure, relieve anxiety, and be a great all-around stress buster. There’s some suggestion that, as a member of the sage family, it may even have a positive impact on memory and mental function.

Finally, clary sage oil has been shown to have excellent anti-inflammatory and moderate antibacterial effects, as well as anesthetic properties. It is worth keeping in mind, though, that clary sage oil does not appear to prevent inflammation but instead acts as a treatment for it.

Peppermint in Aromatherapy

Menta Piperita

 Peppermint (botanical name Menta Piperita) is basically a hybrid plant – a cross between the spearmint and watermint. Although the herb is native to Europe, presently it is grown across the globe. This perennial herb possesses numerous therapeutic properties that were identified and used by the Indians, Egyptians and Chinese since the ancient times. In order to avail the detoxifying attributes of the peppermint, the ancient Romans used to make wreaths with this herb and wear them as crowns during festivities. Owing to its sharp and spicy fragrance, peppermint is well accepted by most people.

The peppermint plant usually grows up to a height of 30 cm to 90 cm. The plant has smooth stems that are squares in cross section. The rhizomes or subterraneous roots of the plant are fleshy and travel far and wide, while the bare roots are fibrous. The plant bears deep green leaves with reddish veins that are 4 cm to 9 cm in length and 1.5 cm to 4 cm in width. The peppermint plant bears purplish blooms that have four-lobed corolla in whorls around the stem. The plant usually blossoms between mid and late summer.

The essential oil extracted from peppermint not only has a soothing effect, but it also rejuvenates the skin and is tremendously resourceful for domestic use. The oil possesses a clearing aroma that is effective in fighting fatigue and, at the same time, very stimulating. Use of this essential oil enhances the capability to concentrate as well as brings clarity of thoughts and decisions. Peppermint essential oil is said to be inspiring and revitalizing.

It may be mentioned here that irrespective of the herb, all essential oils are prepared solely using the herbs or the plants. This denotes that the essential oils do not enclose any outside element, such as moisturizer, which could dilute their attributes or potency. As a result, whenever bottles containing essential oils are opened, they exude an exceptionally strong smell.

Peppermint essential oil is beneficial for people enduring headaches, asthma, cramps, fainting, colic, flatulence, nausea, and fevers. It is known to be highly effective in relieving pains associated with these conditions. This oil also has the potential to alleviate the symptoms of insomnia, distress, tension, anxiousness, lethargy and/ or vertigo (light-headedness).

The essential oil extracted from peppermint can be used in various ways. Some of the different uses of peppermint essential oil are briefly mentioned below.

Provided you have a water spritzer (a container for two different liquids or drinks), fill it up with water and add a few drops of peppermint essential oil to it. If the bottles are small, you need to add just 15 to 20 drops of the oil, while you may add 20-30 drops of oil in medium-sized bottles. Shake the mixture of oil and water thoroughly and gently spray it on your bedding, curtains and also carpets as an alternative to a room deodorizer.

Get a small pot filled with water for boiling over a stove top. Add three to five drops of peppermint essential oil to the water and inhale the aromatic vapor. While doing so, ensure that you take deep and slow breaths enabling the mixture to infuse your lungs.

In aromatherapy, peppermint can be effectively used as a massage oil to alleviate a number of conditions. However, as in the case of any essential oil, remember to dilute the peppermint essential oil blending it with any suitable carrier oil before use. In fact, the moisturizers present in carrier oils help to make the skin smooth and softer – supple to touch. As the concentration of peppermint essential oil is extremely high, only a few drops (one to three) of it need to be added to a little amount of carrier oil.

These days, there are several stores that sell ceramic oil burners meant for aromatherapy. Generally, these ceramic oil burners have the appearance of archetypal, glass milk bottles, but are smaller having a small, detachable, saucer-shaped lid, underneath which one can position a tea-candle. When you have lit the candle, replace the lid and pour in a small quantity of peppermint essential oil in the lid. As the candle will heat the oil in the lid, the sharp and spicy aroma of peppermint will infuse the air. This will help to refresh your senses.

You may also put in two to three drops of peppermint essential oil on a handkerchief and fold it before placing it under a pillow. While the delicate aroma of the oil will not be too intense for your nose, it will help in ensuring sound sleep.

As mentioned earlier, peppermint essential oil possesses numerous therapeutic properties and is, hence, used to treat a number of conditions. Its health benefits are many and some of them are briefly discussed below.

  • Since peppermint oil possesses potent antiseptic properties, it is very helpful in dental care. This oil not only helps to get rid of foul breath but also aids the gums and teeth to fight germs. Therefore, it is hardly surprising that peppermint essential oil forms the active ingredient in toothpaste. In addition, like clove oil, peppermint essential oil is highly effective in healing toothaches.
  • The essential oil extracted from peppermint is also effective in alleviating digestive problems while promoting digestion. On many occasions, people add a few drops of peppermint essential oil in a glassful of water and drink it following a meal with a view to facilitating digestion. The digestive properties of peppermint essential oil make it an excellent tonic for those enduring poor appetite. This oil also possesses carminative properties and, hence, is effective in expelling gas formed in the stomach and intestines, thereby, providing relief from flatulence and bloating. In addition, this essential oil is also useful when one is suffering from an upset stomach or motion sickness. Initial research has established that a blend of peppermint essential oil and caraway oil can also be used to effectively treat heartburns.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also a good home remedy to cure a headache and nausea. Topical application of watered down peppermint oil on the forehead is helpful in providing relief from headaches.
  • As in the case of the majority of the essential oils, peppermint essential oil also has the aptitude to alleviate tension, depression as well as mental exhaustion. These actions of peppermint essential oil are attributed to its ability to revitalize and refresh. This oil is also helpful in providing relief from nervous anxiety and restiveness. It is also known to be an effective remedy for insomnia.
  • Peppermint essential oil is rich in menthol content and, hence, is helpful in clearing the congestion in the respiratory tract. It also possesses potent expectorant properties which help it to draw out mucus and phlegm from the lungs, providing instant, albeit provisional, relief in several respiratory problems, such as cold and cough, sinusitis, nasal congestion, bronchitis and even asthma. Owing to these actions of peppermint essential oil, it is widely used in several formulations for cold rubs. Massaging or rubbing the cold rubs enclosing peppermint essential oil on the chest helps to get rid of nasal congestion as well as blockage of the respiratory tract almost instantly.
  • The essential oil extracted from the peppermint plant also possesses analgesic properties and, hence, it can be used topically to get relief from pains and aches. Peppermint essential oil encloses calcium antagonism which is believed to facilitate in providing relief from pain. This oil also has a cooling nature, which is effective in bringing down high temperatures during fever.
  • It is important to note that peppermint essential oil is highly effectual for colonoscopy, gastroscopy, and also during double-contrast barium enema (the inducement of a barium salt suspension into the rectum and colon before taking an X-ray). In such cases, peppermint essential oil is applied intraluminally (a lumen inside the space of a tubular structure, such as an artery or intestine). Presently, scientists are studying the additional benefits of the oil’s anti-spasmodic properties.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also known to augment blood circulation throughout the body.
  • It has been found that the essential oil extracted from peppermint plant possesses the property to relax the muscles. Also, relaxing the stomach muscles helps in alleviating irritable bowel syndrome. Initial findings of several types of research have proved this action of the oil, but the scientists are yet to determine the precise manner in which it works.
  • As mentioned before, peppermint essential oil contains high amounts of menthol which is beneficial for the health of the skin. Owing to the presence of menthol, using this oil topically on the skin brings forth a cooling effect. In addition, this oil nurtures dry skin and removes the problems associated with oily skin.
  • Peppermint essential oil also helps to fortify the immune system, thereby, enhancing the body’s capability to fight against diseases. In addition, this essential oil also helps to safeguard the body against several ailments.
  • Peppermint essential oil is also extremely beneficial for our hair. It brings forth a calming effect when applied on the head and facilitates getting rid of dandruff and lice. In addition, peppermint nourishes the hair follicles and makes the hair appear glistening.
  • Although researchers are still trying to ascertain the anti-cancerous properties of peppermint essential oil, it is generally believed that this oil is helpful in treating cancer. However, peppermint essential oil is said to be effective in curing tuberculosis.
  • Many herbalists recommend the use of peppermint essential oil for people suffering from urinary tract infections (UTI). Nevertheless, it needs to be mentioned that the scientists are yet to ascertain the use of peppermint essential oil for this purpose.

General properties

  • antibacterial
  • antiseptic
  • antispasmodic
  • carminative
  • stimulant
  • stomachic
  • tonic

Blends well with

  • eucalyptus
  • juniper
  • lemon
  • rosemary
  • rosewood

General uses

  • abdominal pains
  • acne
  • anorexia nervosa
  • bites
  • bruises
  • colic
  • coughing
  • mouth thrush
  • mouth ulcers
  • nausea
  • painful menstruation
  • stings
  • stress
  • swollen gums
  • toothache


Although the essential oil extracted from peppermint possesses several therapeutic properties, it is said that this oil negates the efficacy of a number of homeopathic medications. Similar is the case for the essential oil derived from eucalyptus.

DIY Moisturizing Skin Serum

Growing up, I was fed the beauty myth that oily skin is bad. The cosmetics industry pushes the use of harsh, drying soaps and products that strip natural oils to help you get rid of shine. However, those natural oils actually help moisturize your skin. Washing them away can result in overly dry skin, rather than soft and supple skin. Really what you want is skin-loving oils like the serum recipe below paired with a nice, gentle astringent for a balanced regimen.

Using natural plant oils is a wonderful way to help nourish and refresh dry skin. Some of my favorites are organic rosehip seed oil, pomegranate seed oil, and tamanu oil. I love how quickly they absorb into the skin, leaving my face soft, but not greasy. Organic plant oils like these are used in the base of most homemade lotion recipes. Lotions often include butters or waxes to help smooth the skin and seal in the moisture. Using oil neat will allow it to absorb into the skin very quickly, and I prefer using this preparation first for daily facial moisturizing. However, you can use this serum as an oil base in a cream recipe if you like. This serum is wonderful for softening the skin on arms and legs as well.

For high-quality skin oils, you want to make sure that they are certified organic and minimally processed. I like to use cold-pressed or expeller-pressed oils that are unrefined. It’s also important to keep them in a cool, dark place. I store mine in the refrigerator and buy often. Because they are minimally processed, high-quality oils can turn rancid if not properly stored. Keep in mind,  a little oil goes a long way.

Okay, it’s time to feed your skin some luscious serum! I use this recipe first thing after showering in the morning and again before bed. I find it especially helpful for dry or sensitive skin, but feel free to play with other carrier oils and essential oils to craft a serum that is perfect for you.



Carrier Oil Base
  • 2 oz. organic jojoba oil or organic sunflower oil
  • 1 oz. organic tamanu oil
  • 1 oz. organic rosehip seed oil
  • ½ oz. organic pomegranate seed oil
  • ½ tsp vitamin E oil
Essential Oils


Pour all carrier oils together into a glass bottle and roll between your palms to mix. Carefully drip each essential oil into the carrier base and roll again to distribute. Use less essential oils if you have skin or fragrance sensitivities. Invert the bottle several times and roll again. Use a coin-sized amount as a facial serum or allover body oil each day.

Make Your Own Green Tea Skin Serum

There is no point in stretching the truth…I am 60 years old and while I have tried to take good care of my skin over the years, my skin-care strategy is evolving as my body ages.As a teenager and young adult, it was all about absorbing extra oil and striving for blemish-free skin. Throughout my thirties and early forties, I used a water-based moisturizing cream with sunscreen daily, and that worked well to help combat the rigors of a busy life.

Recently, I’m finding my skin needs a bit more nourishment and moisture and I’ve been working on creating face and skin treatments that have more of the good oils and concentrated botanicals to meet the requirements of my ever-aging skin. I never would have dreamt of putting oils directly on my face when I was 21, but now my skin seems to soak it all in—leaving my face feeling soft and nourished.

I’ve been reading a great deal lately about the benefits of green tea antioxidants as one of Nature’s many gifts, especially in skin care applications. I thought I might give it a try and use it as a base for a skin serum created specifically for more “seasoned” skin…


Green Sencha Skin Serum

This recipe makes approximately 1 cup of skin serum, which is quite a bit! You can use this as a whole body oil or divide it up and share. The recipe is also easy to half or quarter if you’d like to make a smaller amount.

The first step is to create an infused oil. I used about 1 cup of organic Green Sencha Leaf Tea and covered it completely with organic olive oil in a 1-pint mason-type jar. Allow this to infuse for 4-6 weeks, shaking regularly and making sure the tea stays completely covered with oil. After infusing, strain. Compost the tea.



  1. Combine all ingredients in a glass jar and shake well to combine.
  2. Pour into a dark amber or cobalt blue bottle or jar to protect from light and store in a cool, dark place. This does not need to be refrigerated.
  3. Apply by pouring a small amount in the palm of your hand and gently spread on your face using non-dominant fingers (avoid using your pointer finger or thumb as they put more pressure on your skin.)
  4. You can also use a dropper to collect the oil for application.

Best Essential Oils and Their Benefits

Essential oils, also called volatile oils, are scented oils extracted from plants. Historically, they’ve been used in medicine, cosmetics, perfumes, food, and, more recently, aromatherapy. Essential oils are “essential” because they contain the “essence” of the plant, meaning the taste or odor.

Not only are essential oils popular, they have legitimate therapeutic use and the science to back it up. Although the exact benefit depends on the oil in question, some have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. Others can affect cognitive function, mood, and memory. Some can even help alleviate stiff, sore muscles and joints.

Some essential oils can be applied to the skin, others are best taken orally. However–and this is important–do not ingest or topically apply any essential oils unless you are absolutely certain that they can be used this way. Not all essential oils are safe to take internally and some can irritate the skin. Essential oils are a concentrated source of many phytochemicals and some essential oils must be diluted with an unscented “carrier oil” to be used safely on the skin.

Health Benefits of Common Oils

One of the primary benefits of essential oils is that, when used properly, they offer many benefits and have few, if any, side effects. Many essential oils are effective against harmful organisms. Some can positively affect your mood and mental state. Some essential oils can even help you reduce a headache or feelings of nausea. Aromatherapy uses essential oils to improve quality of life and reduce unpleasant side effects of aggressive therapies and health conditions. Just be careful not to spill them; some surfaces, like painted wood, may react with essential oils.

Lavender Oil

Derived from fresh lavender flowers, lavender oil is one of the most well known essential oils. It appears to slow the activity of the central nervous system, improve sleep quality, promote better concentration, and help encourage hair regrowth in those suffering from alopecia areata, a type of hair loss.

Lavender may also help fight anxiety. In one study, encapsulated lavender oil was found to be effective for generalized anxiety disorder, without sedative effects or potential for abuse.

Eucalyptus Oil

Eucalyptus oil, derived from the leaves of Eucalyptus odorata, a smaller variety of eucalyptus tree, is a powerful biocide. It’s antimicrobial, insecticidal (kills insects), herbicidal, acaricidal (kills ticks and mites), and nematicidal (kills nematodes). It’s especially effective against the bacterial strains Staphylococcus aureusHaemophilus influenzaStaphylococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Eucalyptus oil is great for respiratory health. Inhaling eucalyptus steam can help alleviate a cough and congestion. The aroma of the oil acts as an expectorant, helping to loosen phlegm in the nasal passages and lungs.

In one study, researchers found that the combination of eucalyptus oil and peppermint oil boosts cognitive performance. The same study also found the scent of these two essential oils reduce headaches and promote mental and muscular relaxation.

Peppermint Oil


Peppermint oil can help alleviate nausea, a headache, upset stomach, gas, indigestion, and anxiety. It works on the digestive system by speeding up the rate of elimination. Peppermint oil calms the involuntary smooth muscle of the stomach, producing an antispasmodic effect, and improves the flow of bile. It can help soothe discomfort associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and studies have shown that encapsulated peppermint oil can reduce IBS symptoms in as many as 80% of people who take it. Peppermint oil is effective because it contains menthol that interferes with the movement of electrolytes across cell membranes, stopping involuntary contractions.

Beyond digestive help, peppermint oil may offer relief for HSV-1 (Herpes simplex) outbreaks by permeating the skin and acting as a virucide directly on the virus. More research is needed, but preliminary results suggest topical application may fight outbreaks.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil is another essential oil with strong antimicrobial properties. Also known as melaleuca oil, tea tree oil comes from “tea” or “paperbark” trees. In Australia, it has a long history of use as an antiseptic. Bundjalung aborigines native to Australia inhaled the aroma of crushed leaves to relieve a cough and used poultices to help heal wounds.

Today, we know that tea tree oil is antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiprotozoal. It fights harmful organisms by damaging cell membranes. Tea tree oil also inhibits the growth and sporulation of yeast and fungus. The oil can be applied topically to cuts to discourage infection.

Like peppermint oil, tea tree oil seems to have an effect on HSV-1. One study revealed that, while topical tea tree oil doesn’t prevent recurrent herpes outbreaks, it may reduce viral load by up to 98.2%.

Jojoba Oil

Jojoba oil is derived from the seeds of the wild jojoba shrub, a small, woody desert plant native to Arizona, California, and northwestern Mexico. Historically, Native Americans used jojoba oil to help wounds heal. Jojoba oil contains unique fatty acids and fatty alcohol esters that are similar, but superior, to those found in sperm whales.

Unlike other essential oils, jojoba oil is not a volatile oil, but still offers plenty of benefits, primarily to the skin. With respect to wound healing, researchers found that jojoba oil accelerates the closure of wounds at a cellular level. To improve skin appearance and reduce acne, incorporate jojoba oil into your skincare routine. Evidence indicates that clay-jojoba oil facial masks might be an effective remedy for mild acne.

Blue Chamomile Oil

Blue chamomile oil is extracted from German chamomile. The vibrant color of blue chamomile oil is a result of the steam extraction process—the azulene content in the oil darkens to an inky blue, brilliant azure, or deep green. This color fades and turns dark yellow during storage, but, don’t worry, the oil’s benefits don’t fade.

Chamomile has been used therapeutically for thousands of years by Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians to remedy everything from skin conditions and injuries to fever and insomnia. As a traditional medicine, blue chamomile oil may help with eczema, wounds, bruises, burns, canker sores, mastitis, and other conditions.

Chamomile is also appreciated for its anti-inflammatory effects. One study found that chamomile inhibits and prevents a chemical process in the body that incites inflammation. Further, chamomile seems to inhibit the effects of the stomach-ulcer-provoking bacteria Helicobacter pylori.

Chamomile tea can help with insomnia, and inhaling the aroma of chamomile oil produces a mild sedative effect on the brain, which makes you feel sleepy. Like lavender, chamomile oil offers a mild anti-anxiety effect for those who suffer from generalized anxiety disorder.

Rose Oil

Rose oil is a floral-scented essential oil derived from the petals of several species of rose. In contrast, rose absolute is not an essential oil because the essence of the rose is extracted using a more intense chemical extraction processes. Like other essential oils, rose oil promotes a calm mood and fights harmful organisms. It contains tocopherol (a vitamin E compound), carotene, and high levels of phenolic compounds. Rose oil can make your skin more permeable so it’s often added to skin care products to improve efficacy.

Oregano Oil

Oregano oil contains carvacrol, a powerful organic compound with a long list of beneficial properties, including fighting harmful organisms. Carvacrol also supports liver health.

Jasmine Oil

Jasmine oil is derived from jasmine flowers. While many of the essential oils mentioned are sleep aids and relaxants, jasmine oil has a stimulating effect. When applied topically, jasmine oil increases alertness, breathing rate, and vigor. These effects may promote an uplifted mood and better sense of well-being.

Copaiba Oil

Copaiba oil is extracted from the Amazonian plants in the Copaifera genus. Copaiba oil contains copalic acid, which seems to halt the growth of common, but harmful, dental bacteria such as Streptococcus pyogenusStreptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus mutagens. Copaiba oil also has strong anti-inflammatory effects. Unlike most essential oils, copaiba oil can be taken orally.

Bergamot Oil

Bergamot oil is known for its calming effects, but it may also encourage a healthy body weight and help with vascular and heart health. Researchers aren’t yet sure how, but bergamot oil encourages normal cholesterol levels and blood sugar.

Neroli Oil

Neroli oil is derived from the blossom of Citrus aurantium, also known as the bitter orange tree, which is native to tropical and subtropical Asia. The oil goes by many names but is frequently called “orange bitters” and “Seville orange.” It’s known as Neroli because of a 17th-century Italian princess, Anne Marie Orsini of Nerola, took a liking to the scent. Neroli oil is commonly added to diet pills due to its ability to act as an appetite suppressant. One of the major benefits of Neroli oil is that it helps relieve symptoms associated with menopause and stress. It also boosts the actions of the endocrine system, fights harmful organisms, and soothes irritation.

Lemon Balm Oil

Also called valerian, lemon balm is another essential oil that helps with symptoms of menopause, especially disordered sleep patterns. Lemon balm also seems to sharpen memory and boost problem-solving abilities. Some promising research indicates that it may improve recall for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Pomegranate Oil

Pomegranate oil comes from the many seeds of the pomegranate. It’s exceptionally rich in linolenic acid, an essential fatty acid. Some research suggests pomegranate oil may even delay the development of colon cancer and skin cancer. The oil also enhances the immune system.

Frankincense Oil

Frankincense oil is extracted from Boswellia tree sap and has a long history of therapeutic use. Most interestingly, frankincense promotes normal cell growth.

How to Use Essential Oils

Most essential oils are safe to use, but you have to pay attention to their intended use and stick to those applications. Some oils can only be used aromatically and should not be applied to the skin or taken orally. You may have noticed that many of the oils are effective against harmful organisms. Those effects aren’t always limited to harmful organisms—they might affect gut and skin microbiota, too. Others can kill cells indiscriminately, including normal tissue cells.

There are, of course, gentle essential oils that are great for the skin. Neroli oil, for example, promotes circulation and soothes irritation. Rose oil moisturizes the skin and is used as a gentle toner. To take advantage of some of the skin benefits of essential oils, AquaSpirit® contains Neroli, rose, jasmine, and lavender oil. It encourages healthy-looking, radiant skin and promotes well-being.

Holiday Homecoming Diffuser Blend

A great DIY Holiday Essential Oil Diffuser Blend Recipe for the Christmas Season:

sweet orange aromatherapy

Sweet Orange Essential Oil:

Description: Sweet Orange is one of the most commonly used essential oils because of its diverse and beneficial properties. Its uplifting and familiar aroma makes it an ideal oil to add to diffuser blends. Some of its properties include Anti-inflammatory, Antispasmodic, Antidepressant, Diuretic, Tension Relieving, Uplifting, Muscle Soothing.

Directions: Add to your diffuser for aromatherapy benefits. Recommended to properly blend with a carrier oil prior to topical applications.

Cautions: None known

GC/MS Lot#: Sweet-Orange-0104
GC/MS Lot#: Sweet-Orange-0103
GC/MS Lot#: Sweet-Orange-0102
GC/MS Lot#: Sweet-Orange-0101



Description: Frankincense has been used for thousands of years for spiritual, health, and cosmetic benefits. In aromatherapy, it is used to ease feelings of grief and to create feelings of peace and serenity. When applied topically, it is rejuvenating to the skin and joints.

Directions: Recommended to properly blend with a carrier oil prior to topical applications.

Cautions: Frankincense is extremely gentle to the skin.

GC/MS Lot#: Frankincense-0103
GC/MS Lot#: Frankincense-0102
GC/MS Lot#: Frankincense-0101

peppermint oil


Description: Peppermint essential oil is well known to aid in digestion. It contains menthol, well known for its ability to warm and cool. The menthol will aid in digestion and is beneficial to the sinuses. Peppermint is great for the muscular system and helps relieve cramps during menstruation. It’s a fresh, energizing, essential oil that stimulates mental clarity, reduces fatigue, and reduces stress.

Directions: Add to your diffuser for aromatherapy benefits. Recommended to properly blend with a carrier oil prior to topical applications.

Cautions: Possible skin sensitivity. Keep out of reach of children. If pregnant or under a doctor’s care, consult your physician.

GC/MS Lot#: Peppermint-0106
GC/MS Lot#: Peppermint-0105
GC/MS Lot#: Peppermint-0104
GC/MS Lot#: Peppermint-0103
GC/MS Lot#: Peppermint-0102
GC/MS Lot#: Peppermint-0101



Description: The bud of this evergreen, indigenous to Southeast Asia, has a long history as an effective agent for minor pains and aches, particularly dental pain when blended with a carrier oil and applied to the outer jaw. It is widely used in contemporary Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine.

Directions: Add to your diffuser for aromatherapy benefits. Recommended to properly blend with a carrier oil prior to topical applications.

Cautions: Clove Bud Oil should only be used in dilution. It should be avoided during pregnancy. May cause skin irritation in some individuals; a skin test is recommended prior to use.

GC/MS Lot#: Clove-0104
GC/MS Lot#: Clove-0103
GC/MS Lot#: Clove-0102
GC/MS Lot#: Clove-0101

barefut essential oils



Description: Grown and distilled in Sri Lanka, barefūt’s 100% Pure Cinnamon Essential Oil is of the highest quality in the world!

Not only does cinnamon support a healthy immune system, but it also has many emotional and spiritual benefits. Cinnamon Essential Oil can help to release buried feelings of anger, frustration or pain caused by past trauma. It can also help to create feelings of security, safety and trust with relationships. These are just a few of the many blessings of cinnamon. Cinnamon may also increase brain function, aid in recovering from infections, and strengthen your immune system.

Directions: Add to your diffuser for aromatherapy benefits. Recommended to properly blend with a carrier oil prior to topical applications.

Cautions: Dilute properly with a carrier oil prior to topical applications at a maximum dilution of 0.1%. Avoid use during pregnancy or breastfeeding.

GC/MS Lot#: Cinnamon-0103
GC/MS Lot#: Cinnamon-0102
GC/MS Lot#: Cinnamon-0101